Assess Your Personality (MBTI)

  • You may be interested to know how your personality could influence your career choice. Although personality is a complex attribute, there is one aspect known as personal preference that has been studied thoroughly and which has proven relevance to the career decision making process.
  • The theory of personal preference is based on the idea that we seem to be born with preferred ways to obtain our energy, take in information, reach decisions and deal with the outside world. These preferences lead to the definition of 16 different personality types each of which is characterised by preferred behaviour patterns. These in turn can influence our choice of career.
  • The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) helps you to gain a better understanding of your own preferences. This is available either in the "Personality and Career Choice" workshops in the first and second semesters (details on this site), or in one to one discussions with a Careers Adviser.
  • By the end of the process, you should have a clearer idea about your personal preferences. You will receive a list of occupations towards which people of the same type are often attracted. You will also be shown how to research those in which you might be interested.
  • If you are interested in taking the MBTI, just call into the Careers Service and speak to one of the reception staff, who will arrange for you to complete the questionnaire.

Further Information

  • The Main Library carries a loan copy of Gifts Differing by Isabel Briggs Myers. It provides an excellent introduction to the study of personality type. The Careers Service has reference copies of Do What You Are and The Art of Speedreading People, both of which are based upon Myers Briggs theory.
  • Internet search engines will reveal a number of Myers Briggs sites which provide on-line questionnaires. However, they are not necessarily the same version which the Careers Service offers. Staff in the Careers Service have been trained and qualified as Myers Briggs practitioners under the auspices of Oxford Psychologists Press .

Page Owner: reg131
Page Created: Friday 10 July 2009 09:56:18 by t00214
Last Modified: Tuesday 25 August 2009 13:09:15 by t00214
Expiry Date: Sunday 10 October 2010 09:53:21
Assembly date: Tue Sep 02 17:20:54 BST 2014
Content ID: 9327
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